Yorkshire Terrier Holistic Veterinary Medicine

The world of veterinary medicine is a very vast and diverse field that is important and much sought after in today’s society. There are millions of pet owners worldwide who strive to take the utmost care of their treasured animals by seeking out only the best care available in veterinary medicine. Yet, just as many people have begun searching out alternative methods for healing and wellness in their own bodies, holistic veterinary medicine has become more popular in recent years as well. People are finding that treating with drugs and man-made shots are often detrimental to the health of their pets instead of beneficial. So, the move toward a more natural approach to healing has begun in the scope of veterinary care.

Holistic Veterinary Medicine Employs Many Alternative Therapies

Similar to the holistic concept with regard to humans, the holistic veterinary medicine practitioners believe in a more natural approach to animal wellness using a variety of therapies that may or may not work upon the pet, based on their individual make-up and problems. One way that holistic veterinarians approach an animal’s health is by looking at aspects such as nutrition and vitamins. Many faithful pet owners have heard that feeding an animal “table food” is detrimental to the health of the animal. Obesity can occur, as well as an increase in plaque and related dental issues. Over time, the minerals and vitamins can become depleted, just as in the human body, when too much processed or junk food is consumed. Many advocates of holistic veterinary medicine tout the benefits of a raw animal food diet for their pets, including raw meats, fish and other unprocessed, whole foods.

Another method that holistic veterinary medicine employs is a behavioral therapy concept in which the animal is taught new things and is nurtured mentally in many ways. Dog training classes are often advocated as a good way for the owner and the pet to bond with one another and for the pet to learn obedience. Alternative therapies such as acupuncture, hypnosis, etc. can also be used to help animals, just as it is for humans. The clinics that employ this type of therapy are generally more expensive than conventional veterinary care, yet for many people, it is worth the extra cost to help ensure their animal is healthy and well for many years to come.

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